India to allow in imports of US pork and other products, say officials

2 weeks ago 19

India has agreed to allow imports of U.S. pork and pork products into India, removing a longstanding barrier to U.S. agricultural trade, U.S. Trade Representative Katherine Tai and Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said on Monday.

"India's agreement to allow U.S. pork imports for the first time is great news for U.S. producers and for Indian consumers," Tai said in a statement.

Vilsack said Washington was working to ensure the U.S. pork industry could start shipping products to India as soon as possible. He said the deal marked the culmination of two decades of seeking market access for U.S. pork to India.

In 2020, the United States was the world's third-largest pork producer and second-largest exporter, with global sales of pork and pork products valued at $7.7 billion. In fiscal year 2021, the United States exported more than $1.6 billion of agricultural products to India.

At a revived U.S.-India Trade Policy Forum in New Delhi last November, India and the United States agreed https://www.reuters.com/markets/commodities/india-us-aim-expand-farm-trade-resolve-market-access-issues-2021-11-23 to expand trade of some agricultural products, including U.S. cherries, alfalfa and distiller dried grains as well as Indian mangoes, grapes, shrimp and water buffalo meat.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi met President Joe Biden in Washington in September and both leaders agreed to expand trade ties to strengthen relations between the world's largest and richest democracies.

India is still pressing for restoration of its beneficiary status under the Generalized System of Preferences, the U.S. program that provides some tariff-free access for imports from developing countries that expired at the end of 2020.

(Reporting by Andrea Shalal and Ismail Shakil; Editing by Sandra Maler and Howard Goller)

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

Dear Reader,


Business Standard has always strived hard to provide up-to-date information and commentary on developments that are of interest to you and have wider political and economic implications for the country and the world. Your encouragement and constant feedback on how to improve our offering have only made our resolve and commitment to these ideals stronger. Even during these difficult times arising out of Covid-19, we continue to remain committed to keeping you informed and updated with credible news, authoritative views and incisive commentary on topical issues of relevance.
We, however, have a request.

As we battle the economic impact of the pandemic, we need your support even more, so that we can continue to offer you more quality content. Our subscription model has seen an encouraging response from many of you, who have subscribed to our online content. More subscription to our online content can only help us achieve the goals of offering you even better and more relevant content. We believe in free, fair and credible journalism. Your support through more subscriptions can help us practise the journalism to which we are committed.

Support quality journalism and subscribe to Business Standard.

Digital Editor

Read Entire Article