Russia, US hold working dinner in Geneva, kicking off talks over Ukraine

1 week ago 26

Top Russian and US officials held a working dinner in Geneva on Sunday as part of the kickoff to a string of meetings with bilateral ties at a low ebb over Russia's military buildup near Ukraine.

Topics
Russia | United States | Ukraine

AP  |  Geneva 

Top Russian and US officials held a working dinner in Geneva on Sunday as part of the kickoff to a string of meetings in three European cities this week, with bilateral ties at a low ebb over Russia's military buildup near Ukraine.

Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov and other Russian officials arrived in the evening for a meeting at the residence of the US ambassador to the Conference on Disarmament, diplomatic officials said.

The luxury apartment overlooks Lake Geneva.

Ryabkov was meeting with US Deputy Secretary of State Wendy Sherman and her team.

Earlier on Sunday, Russian Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova said on state television that a first round of narrow-format talks on security would get underway during the day, according to Tass news agency.

The less formal Sunday talks come ahead of a broader discussion between the two diplomats and their teams at the US mission in Geneva starting Monday, a first step toward rekindling dialogue as ties have worsened because Russia has deployed an estimated 1,00,000 troops along its border with Ukraine. Concerns have risen about a broader Russian military incursion in the country.

Russian President Vladimir Putin's government has laid out a list of demands, such as seeking guarantees that the NATO military alliance won't seek to expand any further eastward to countries like Ukraine or Georgia, which are former Soviet republics.

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken told ABC's "This Week on Sunday he didn't expect any breakthroughs in talks in the bilateral talks in Geneva or during conversations in Brussels, at a meeting of the NATO-Russia Council, and at the Organization for Cooperation and Security in Europe in Vienna later this week.

The United States and other Western allies have pledged severe costs to Russia if it moves against Ukraine.

The question really now is whether President Putin will take the path of diplomacy and dialogue or seeks confrontation," Blinken said.

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

Dear Reader,


Business Standard has always strived hard to provide up-to-date information and commentary on developments that are of interest to you and have wider political and economic implications for the country and the world. Your encouragement and constant feedback on how to improve our offering have only made our resolve and commitment to these ideals stronger. Even during these difficult times arising out of Covid-19, we continue to remain committed to keeping you informed and updated with credible news, authoritative views and incisive commentary on topical issues of relevance.
We, however, have a request.

As we battle the economic impact of the pandemic, we need your support even more, so that we can continue to offer you more quality content. Our subscription model has seen an encouraging response from many of you, who have subscribed to our online content. More subscription to our online content can only help us achieve the goals of offering you even better and more relevant content. We believe in free, fair and credible journalism. Your support through more subscriptions can help us practise the journalism to which we are committed.

Support quality journalism and subscribe to Business Standard.

Digital Editor

Read Entire Article