Taliban has to fulfil promises if they want resources to be unfrozen: UN

1 week ago 27

The UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) High Commissioner Filippo Grandi has said that the Taliban has to fulfil some promises if they want their financial resources to be unfrozen.

Topics
Taliban | Afghanistan | United Nations

ANI 

The UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) High Commissioner Filippo Grandi has said that the Taliban has to fulfil some promises if they want their financial resources to be unfrozen.

The UN commissioner for refugees further said that Afghan women and girls must be allowed to attend schools, and minorities must be represented, reported Tolo News.

Meanwhile, he also told the Washington Post that it is important to maintain dialogue with the Islamic Emirate, saying that this will ensure that Afghanistan is "viable", reported Tolo News.

"But in the end, in the end, it is important to maintain that dialogue with the Taliban, because all these systems will be temporary in nature, and how to ensure that Afghanistan is viable, is a viable country able to support its people, I think will only be achieved through dialogue between the international community and the Taliban themselves," said Grandi.

Grandi added that he delivered the same message to the Islamic Emirate when he was visiting Kabul that the "Taliban" has to fulfil some promises if they want their financial resources to be unfrozen, reported Tolo News.

"When I was in Kabul, and when my colleagues were there, we all told the Taliban the same message. If you want your resources to be unfrozen, if you want the country to enjoy again substantive development support by the international community, you also have to take steps in their direction. It's--it goes both ways, but it is a dialogue. It cannot be a wall-to-wall situation, said Grandi.

Following the Taliban takeover in mid-August, the US froze nearly 10 billion dollars in Afghanistan's assets and slapped sanctions on the Islamic Emirate.

In the meantime, the stoppage of foreign aids to Afghanistan has crippled the already fragile economic system of Afghanistan and has adversely affected the lives of millions of people.

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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